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20130121
20130129
STATION
KQED (PBS) 18
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English 18
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
, voting rights act, civil rights act just on the triumph of getting social welfare legislation through and here comes vietnam in 1965 overshadowing it all and everything turns and as you're listening to the tapes of these conversations and you hear the despair in his -- the growing despair in his voice as vietnam comes to overshadow everything he wanted to do and that he wanted to started to do in the second term. you see how a second term can go really bad. >> rose: what did he say "that bitch of a war stole --" >> the woman i love, the great society. >> rose: the challenge for a second term? >> well, the challenge i think often times is that a president who's had great reelections suddenly finds he has less power than he thought he had. franklin park zoo in -- franklin roosevelt in 1937, more democratic congress than in any time of the century suddenly realize that the supreme court can keep on overruling the things he gets passed through congress so he tries to pack the supreme court, slapped down, bad second term. in nixon's case-- and i think bob woodward can speak on this, too--
on civil rights, but we can be right -- we can be first on human rights. instead of being laughed, we want to be first at something, and we believe being first ending abortion is a good thing. >> 3 hours drive from jackson, you have reached the mississippi delta. in one of the poorest parts of america, choosing to have an abortion is not an option for many women. they cannot afford to pay for the procedure. >> she is 13 years old. last month, she gave birth to her daughter. >> it is hard to go to school. i'm very sleepy. >> [indiscernible] >> gin at ground level has been working with pregnant teenagers in the delta and for 17 years. she is worried that the jackson clinic closes, more of these weylandt will have an unwanted pregnancies. -- more of these women will have unwanted pregnancies. >> [indiscernible] >> hsu became a mother two years ago when she had her daughter. now out of work, she is struggling with her decision not to become a mother again. >> i know this is something i have to do. i have to do this for me. >> bbc news, mississippi. >> the restriction of abortion rights 40 year
. in a fundamental way, labor has to work with the kinds of folks we talked about here, civil rights, in a much more basic way than they have the last 80 years. it has to be like core, we're in this together. we're going to fight foreclosures as much as we're going to fight for bargaining rights. we're going to fight climate change as much as we're going to fight to raise the standard of living. it's going to take that kind of labor movement, and i think a lot of us are ripe for that kind of labor movement. >> last year, 2012, labor took a series of defeats right on the chin in wisconsin, michigan and other places. i think you wrote recently that 88% of the workers in this country do not have collective bargaining rights, and 12% who do are constantly fighting a defensive battle. how do you change that? is labor dying? >> i think -- well, the way we change that is that part of the agenda, the economic justice part that the democracy part goes with it, but on the economic justice front, part of it is to get the partners, which there are now, the greens, the civil rights, the students, the others, to
a bad signal to society of repression and limitation of civil rights guaranteed by the constitution of the russian federation. >> several russian cities have already passed similar local laws. the move to legislate on the federal level enjoys popular support. surveys showed 2/3 of the russian public find homosexuality morally unacceptable. the bill has been criticized by human-rights groups, including the kremlin's human rights council. bbc news in moscow. >> stocks rose today as the euro hit an 11-month high. investors took heart that europe's financial crisis may have eased. it is ironic as the situation improves, the real economic situation for many europeans its worst -- gets worse. the british economy shrunk more than expected. the belgian economy is just as bleak. throughout northern and southern europe, the fear is losing your job. >> the fire has been burning for three months fell, who arming the striking workers. they are the latest victims of europe's economic crisis. say goodbye to the sprawling ford factory in eastern belgium. it is shutting down. with europe in recessio
enough to be there for all of them. >> the president spoke about selma, civil rights, seneca falls, stonewalled, where the modern gay rights movement was born. the couple of things happen. congress will have an impact on the administration. harry reid and mitch mcconnell of reaching an agreement on the filibuster, nothing profound, but that they will raise the debt ceiling to may 18. how will this impact the presidency? >> what the house did is a sign of what is ahead of us. they have not gone over the defeat from november. they have no leverage. they discovered they have the leverage and now have to wait to back down. this is a face-saving device to kick it down the road until may. the president is in a much stronger position in dealing with the republicans in the house. >> do you agree with that? >> i always respect colby's opinion, but the president, like any reelected president, essentially, absent a national event where he becomes a dramatic figure, watches his popularity be rationed out day- by-day. he is strong now. it is hard to believe that he will be as strong a year from
in an inaugural address and him linking civil rights and women's rights and gay rights and mentioning the stonewall uprising that gave birth to the gay rights movement was i thought a significant articulation of a vision of where the country is. >> that may be his vision but can he really get there? and particularly with a speech like that. certainly it had to do with being a second term as well. but with a speech like that, which was really sort of an in-your-face speech, how does he get what he wants? >> well, i think it is the obvious question, and i mean one thing you can say is, well, the way he tried in the first term, he does not think was successful. he got some things done obviously. got some big things done with health care. but in the end he wasn't able to get those things done with that style of leadership. so he's going to try something new. i don't know that it will work. gwen: does the speech help or hurt that? >> the speech makes clear he's adopting a different approach. one of the things he said was, we're not going to resolve centuries old debates about the role of g
it was understood as an incredible affirmation of the humanity and civil rights of african americans. >> desegregating the public schools. >> desegregating the public schools, rejecting separate and unequal. but the truth was, it really didn't desegregate the schools even until today. roe v. wade, which was won, the whole idea of women's equality under the constitution was in its infancy. there had been almost no decisions in 1973 recognizing discrimination against women as prohibited by the constitution. roe v. wade comes down, and it's not understood as an affirmation of women's personhood, that we don't lose our human rights when we become pregnant. but almost overnight the public health situation dramatically improved, not only because women had access to legal abortion, but they didn't have to carry to term pregnancies when they weren't healthy. and so it was a dramatic change in the practicality. but what we're still very much fighting is an understanding and a respect for the fact that women, whatever their decisions are during pregnancy, remain full persons under the law. >>
: then the ceremonies got underway. the former chair of the naacp and widow of the slain civil rights leader delivered the invocation. >> we invoke the prayers of our grandmothers who taught us to pray, "god, make me a blessing." let their spirit guide us as we claim the spirit of old. there's something within me that holds the reins. there's something within me that banishes pain. there's something within me i cannot explain, but all i know, america, there is something within. there is something within. >> brown: perhaps the most rousing moment of the day came from the brooklyn tabernacle choir singing "battle hymn of the republic." ♪ his truth is marching on ♪ marching on >> brown: and then the first oath taking as supreme court justice sonia sotomayor the first of the president's two appointments to the court swore in the vice president. the musical moment changed when james taylor performed america the beautiful alone on his guitar. ♪ o, beautiful for spacious skies ♪ ♪ for amber waves of grain ♪ for purple mountains majesty ♪ ♪ above the fruited plains ♪ america, america >> brow
are allowed, and civil rights attorneys will say that happens, that's allowed all over the country. what bratton did in new york was a much more aggressive form of that. there was -- in heavy crime areas, drug market, open-air drug market areas. you had a very intensive use of stop and frisk. and it had -- there was a -- now, those drug market areas in new york were heavily impacted. now, whether they could have been impacted without stop and frisk is an open question. sociologists say. so, but bratton and other police advocates would say it was instrumental, but, again, that's an open question whether it was, how necessary that was. >> now, how much interaction will bratton have with the community? because at the city council this week, there was heated public testimony for hours with people opposed to having him in the city of oakland and bringing his policies here. how effective can he be if the community doesn't support him? >> it's an interesting question. originally, he was going to be leading the town hall forums where he would be interacting with the community and recognizing the
that saw like he admitted the first civil rights law was really bad but he said the important thing was to pass it. once you pass it, it's easy to go back and fix it. and i think that if i look back on his first term, i think of two things. one was the healthcare and foreign paul is a maybe because i'm writing right now about a president bringing a country into a war it didn't need. i think in a way president obama is winding down wars. >> rose: that's one of the things in the atmosphere about him. jon meacham, three presidents that you know well now, andrew jackson, thomas jefferson and george bush 41. how do you assess the first term of barack obama. >> i think if president obama had somehow lost in november, he would have a very strong historical hand to play. because the prevention of more economic disaster in 2009 is something that is not fully appreciated in real time by people who are suffering, historian like that kind of thing. you could have an assessment of how he had done and he had done pretty well in doing that. and i think that that great historian, the gibbin of our
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)

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